Posted by: crudbasher | July 10, 2013

More Progress On Virtual Teachers

If you think of the role of a teacher, one way to describe it would be to present relevant, important information to the student when they need it. That’s not all they do of course, but it’s an important part.

My theory of Disaggregation talks about how things in society are being reorganized from a physical proximity basis, to a methodology based on information context. As part of this theory, constructs are being taken apart into their component parts and then being reassembled, often on an adhoc basis as users need them. I am still exploring this idea and trying to find the limits of how far it goes. Can a teacher’s job be split up into parts? Can some of them be automated? The answer is yes because it has happened before. When Scantron machines were invented, the act of grading multiple choice tests was removed from the teacher. It is quite likely that more parts are about to be automated away from the teacher.

Here’s a demo video from the creators of Siri (the voice assistant on iPhones). This demo product is trying to provide users with a better way of interacting with computers. (H/T Kurzweil AI)

Did you notice in the video how the system is always keeping track of what you are doing? Based on context it can suggest things and also can act as a personal assistant.

All of this adds up to computers becoming more aware of the user and what they are doing. This is a prerequisite to creating a virtual teacher.

 

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Responses

  1. Thank you for this blog post. You’re so right on with this article. “To present relevant, important information to the student when they need it” is what it’s all about! The ‘when” is as important as the” what” that’s being presented!
    Thank you, Andrew!

  2. Reblogged this on Ketsana Phommalee and commented:
    Thank you for this blog post. You’re so right on with this article. “To present relevant, important information to the student when they need it” is what it’s all about! The ‘when” is as important as the” what” that’s being presented!
    Thank you, Andrew!


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