Posted by: crudbasher | February 17, 2012

How Technology Is Making Your Job Obsolete

This article by Thomas Freedman of the New York Times has some interesting examples of the Disaggregation effect I have been focused on for a number of months. While I tend to come from the right side of the political spectrum, I don’t blame President Obama for all the job losses of the past 4 years and the unemployment rate staying at a high rate for a record amount of time. Well, he takes some of the blame because he’s in charge but it’s more complicated than that.

I keep looking at the economic data and it shows that businesses are making money but aren’t hiring people. The reason for this is because it’s more expensive to hire a new worker than to replace them with technology in a lot of cases. With a worker you have to pay health insurance with is likely to get a lot more expensive shortly. You need an office space for them, and a computer in a lot of cases. Automating the job is usually much cheaper and much of the cost is up front. First companies outsourced the jobs to India, now they are replacing them with automation. If they aren’t doing automation, they are taking individual tasks and putting the out for bid.

In the article listed below, check out these quotes:

Matt Barrie, is the founder of freelancer.com, which today lists 2.8 million freelancers offering every service you can imagine.

Barrie offered me a few examples on his site right now: Someone is looking for a designer to design “a fully functioning dune buggy.” Forty people are now bidding on the job at an average price of $268. Someone is looking for an architect to design “a car-washing cafe.” Thirty-seven people are bidding on that job at an average price of $168.

Jobs are being disaggregated. The labor force is becoming detached from the companies they support. This affects schools in two ways. First, it means the type of student who needs to graduate needs to have some skills that can’t be replaced easily with a machine. Second, the process of teaching itself is about to come under assault by computers. The actual tasks a teachers does can be split up into pieces and then those pieces will be either outsourced, automated or kept. It has happened in many other industries and will happen in teaching too.

(cc) Mike Licht

How long will it be until you see a request on freelancer.com for a person to write a lesson on how to factor equations? Or somebody to teach a homeschooled group of children about the Spanish American War? Or a request to make a video showing how to drive a car like a stuntman? The idea of having a job for life is going away. It is being replaced instead of shifting from job to job as they come available. In your part time, why not teach a bit?  In the future everyone will be a teacher, and everyone will be a student.

Leonardo DaVinci was known to dabble in a lot of different areas of art and science. Let’s call this model of the new labor force the DaVinci model.

  • Good piece about disaggregation and reaggregation of jobs

    tags: education technology disaggregation jobs robot nell

    • there is no doubt that the main reason for our 9.1 percent unemployment rate is the steep drop in aggregate demand in the Great Recession. But it is not the only reason. “The Great Recession” is also coinciding with — and driving — “The Great Inflection.”
    • In the last decade, we have gone from a connected world (thanks to the end of the cold war, globalization and the Internet) to a hyperconnected world (thanks to those same forces expanding even faster). And it matters. The connected world was a challenge to blue-collar workers in the industrialized West. They had to compete with a bigger pool of cheap labor. The hyperconnected world is now a challenge to white-collar workers. They have to compete with a bigger pool of cheap geniuses — some of whom are people and some are now robots, microchips and software-guided machines.
    • It is also both a huge challenge and opportunity. It has never been harder to find a job and never been easier — for those prepared for this world — to invent a job or find a customer. Anyone with the spark of an idea can start a company overnight, using a credit card, while accessing brains, brawn and customers anywhere.
    • Matt Barrie, is the founder of freelancer.com, which today lists 2.8 million freelancers offering every service you can imagine. “The whole world is connecting up now at an incredibly rapid pace,” says Barrie, and many of these people are coming to freelancer.com to offer their talents. Barrie says he describes this rising global army of freelancers the way he describes his own team: “They all have Ph.D.’s. They are poor, hungry and driven: P.H.D.”
    • Barrie offered me a few examples on his site right now: Someone is looking for a designer to design “a fully functioning dune buggy.” Forty people are now bidding on the job at an average price of $268. Someone is looking for an architect to design “a car-washing cafe.” Thirty-seven people are bidding on that job at an average price of $168. Someone is looking to produce “six formulations of chewing gum” suitable for the Australian market. Two people are bidding at an average price of $375. When Barrie needed a five-word speech to accept a Webby Award, he offered $1,000 for the best idea. He got 2,730 entries and accepted “The Tech Boom Is Back.” Someone looking for “a rap song to help Chinese students learn English” has three bids averaging $157.

    Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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