Posted by: crudbasher | May 30, 2012

The Third Industrial Revolution (Applied To Schools)

Occasionally I read an article that with just a few word changes can apply to the way we learn. As Sir Ken Robinson and others have stated, our current school system is based on the factory model. This makes sense because when it was created the world was in the early stages of the industrial revolution. This article though makes and interesting point: there have actually been two industrial revolutions. The first was when manufacturing was aggregated from cottages into factories. The second was with standardization and assembly lines to mass produce products.

The third is now upon us. The author of the article (annotations at the bottom) thinks that 3d printing will create a massive disruptive effect that will change the way we make products. I think he’s right but what is more interesting to me is how you can take the article and just change a few words and apply it to education. Let me demonstrate.

“The factory school of the past was based on cranking out zillions of identical products educations. […]  But the cost of producing much smaller batches of a wider variety, with each product education tailored precisely to each customer’s students whims, is falling. The factory school of the future will focus on mass customisation—and may look more like those weavers’ cottages than Ford’s assembly line.”

“The geography of supply chains learning will change. An engineer A student working in the middle of a desert who finds he lacks a certain tool piece of knowledge no longer has to have it delivered from the nearest city school. He can simply download the design lesson and print learn it.”

“And with the internet allowing ever more designers teachers to collaborate on new products lessons, the barriers to entry are falling. Ford needed heaps of capital to build his colossal River Rouge factory; his modern equivalent a school can start with little besides a laptop and a hunger to invent.”

“Most jobs will not be on the factory floor in the classroom but in the offices nearby, which will be full of designers, engineers teachers, IT specialists, logistics experts, marketing staff and other professionals. The manufacturing teaching jobs of the future will require more skills.”

Consumers Students will have little difficulty adapting to the new age of better products education, swiftly delivered. Governments, however, may find it harder. Their instinct is to protect industries and companies schools that already exist, not the upstarts that would destroy them. They shower old factories schools with subsidies and bully bosses who want to move production learning abroad. They spend billions backing the new technologies which they, in their wisdom, think will prevail.”

“Governments have always been lousy at picking winners, and they are likely to become more so, as legions of entrepreneurs and tinkerers teachers swap designs lessons online, turn them into products at home schools and market them globally from a garage.”

Pretty cool eh?

  • Great summary of third industrial revolution

    tags: technology disruptive innovation revolution industry nell

    • THE first industrial revolution began in Britain in the late 18th century, with the mechanisation of the textile industry.
    • The second industrial revolution came in the early 20th century, when Henry Ford mastered the moving assembly line and ushered in the age of mass production.
    • Now a third revolution is under way. Manufacturing is going digital.
    • A number of remarkable technologies are converging: clever software, novel materials, more dexterous robots, new processes (notably three-dimensional printing) and a whole range of web-based services.
    • The factory of the past was based on cranking out zillions of identical products
    • But the cost of producing much smaller batches of a wider variety, with each product tailored precisely to each customer’s whims, is falling. The factory of the future will focus on mass customisation—and may look more like those weavers’ cottages than Ford’s assembly line.
    • Now a product can be designed on a computer and “printed” on a 3D printer, which creates a solid object by building up successive layers of material.
    • The geography of supply chains will change. An engineer working in the middle of a desert who finds he lacks a certain tool no longer has to have it delivered from the nearest city. He can simply download the design and print it.
    • And with the internet allowing ever more designers to collaborate on new products, the barriers to entry are falling. Ford needed heaps of capital to build his colossal River Rouge factory; his modern equivalent can start with little besides a laptop and a hunger to invent.
    • Like all revolutions, this one will be disruptive.
    • Most jobs will not be on the factory floor but in the offices nearby, which will be full of designers, engineers, IT specialists, logistics experts, marketing staff and other professionals. The manufacturing jobs of the future will require more skills.
    • Offshore production is increasingly moving back to rich countries not because Chinese wages are rising, but because companies now want to be closer to their customers so that they can respond more quickly to changes in demand. And some products are so sophisticated that it helps to have the people who design them and the people who make them in the same place.
    • Consumers will have little difficulty adapting to the new age of better products, swiftly delivered. Governments, however, may find it harder. Their instinct is to protect industries and companies that already exist, not the upstarts that would destroy them.
    • They shower old factories with subsidies and bully bosses who want to move production abroad. They spend billions backing the new technologies which they, in their wisdom, think will prevail.
    • Governments have always been lousy at picking winners, and they are likely to become more so, as legions of entrepreneurs and tinkerers swap designs online, turn them into products at home and market them globally from a garage.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Responses

  1. The real issue becomes the ultimate results. I have a company that I hire consultants for. I tell them that I do not care when, where and how they get work done. My ultimate goal is profitability and NOT filling desks or validating the use of office space. Great post!

  2. […] background-position: 50% 0px ; background-color:#222222; background-repeat : no-repeat; } educationstormfront.wordpress.com – Today, 7:09 […]


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